Thursday, October 11, 2018

How to Survive in a Fast Paced World Without Being Shallow


As we were completing an exercise into analyzing a tiny application on how would we test it, my pair looked slightly worn out and expressed their concern on going deeper in testing - time. It felt next to impossible to find time to do all the work that needed doing in the last paced agile, changes and deliveries, stories swooshing by. Just covering the basics of everything was a full time work!

I recognized the feeling, and we had a small chat on how I had ended up solving it by sharing much of the testing with my teams developers, to an extent where I might not show up for a story enough to hear it swoosh by. Basic story testing might not be my choice of time, as I have a choice. And right now I have more choices than ever, being the manager of all the developers.

**Note: the developers I have worked with in the two last places I work in are amazing testers, and this is  because I don't hog the joy of testing from them but allow them to contribute to the full. Using my managerial powers to force testing on them is a joke. Even if it has a little truth into it. 

Even with developers doing all the testing they can do, I still have stuff to test as a specialist in testing. And that stuff is usually the things developers have not (yet) learned to pay attention to.

For browser-based applications, I find myself spending time browsers other than developer's favorite and with browser features set away from usual defaults.

For our code and functionality, I find myself spending time interrogating the other software that could reside in the same environment, competing for attention. Some of my coolest bugs are in this category.

For lacking value on anything, I find myself spending time using the application after it has been released, combining analytics and production environment use in my exploration.

To describe my tactic of testing, I was explaining the overall coverage that I am aware of and then choosing my efforts in a very specific pattern. I would first do something simple to show myself that it can work, to make sure I understand what we've built on a shallow level. Then I leave the middle ground of covering stuff for others. Finally, I focus my own efforts into adding things I find likely that others have missed.

This is patchy testing. It's the way I go deep in a fast based world so that I don't have to test everything in a shallow way.

Make a pick and remember: with continuous delivery, you are never really out of time for going deeper to test something. That information is still useful in future cycles of releasing. At least if you care about your users.


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